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KHARTOUM (Xinhua) -- Dealers sell sheep for the upcoming Eid Al-Adha festival in Khartoum, Sudan, Aug. 28, 2017. In a bid to limit the rising prices of the sacrifice sheep of Eid Al-Adha, or the Islamic Feast of the Sacrifice, the authorities in the Sudanese capital Khartoum have implemented a project for selling the sheep by weight, fixing the price of live sheep at 54 Sudanese pounds a kilogram (around 2.5 U.S Dollar in parallel market exchange rate).   XINHUA/MOHAMED KHIDIR
Sudan sells sheep of Eid Al-Adha by weight to reduce price hike

KHARTOUM (Xinhua) -- In a bid to limit the rising prices of the sacrifice sheep of Eid Al-Adha, or the Islamic Feast of the Sacrifice, the authorities in the Sudanese capital Khartoum have implemented a project for selling the sheep by weight, fixing the price of live sheep at 54 Sudanese pounds a kilogram (around 2.5 U.S Dollar in parallel market exchange rate).

The project is conducted by the Sudanese ministries of finance and agriculture in cooperation with the Consumer Protection Centre, and the project officials say it aims at combating price and enables the citizen to select his sacrifice sheep and weigh it to choose the price which he can afford.

Khartoum State has established 15 sale centers at the state’s seven localities to sell the sacrifice sheep by weight, including over 100,000 head of cattle.

Hamid Abdalla Mahmoud, an official in charge of one of the sales centers, told Xinhua Monday that “as you can see, there is a rush to this center which is set for selling the sheep by weight.”

“This is a successful experience according to primary indications. In my viewpoint, selling the sheep by weight is fair for everybody, and the citizen can buy what he can afford based on the weight of the sheep he selects,” he noted.

He reiterated that the project is likely to limit the price hike and combat the phenomenon of brokering.

Mahmoud urged the authorities to expand the experience, saying “We call on the authorities to increase the centers so we can control the sacrifice sheep markets and enable the citizens to buy their sheep.”

Yousif Suleiman Allazim, an official at the Consumer Protection Center, a Sudanese charitable society involved in implementation of the project, for his part, told Xinhua that “this project is also likely to improve the environment of sacrifice sheep markets.”

“The project helps citizens buy healthy sheep as they are examined by veterinary officials,” he noted.

He went on saying that “we are concerned with the interest of the citizens and consumers. This project combats the skyrocketing prices without any justifications other than manipulation of brokers.”

In the meantime, despite the rush by the citizens to these selling-by-weight centers, some citizens expressed concern that the practical application of the idea may show some disadvantages and defects.

“The idea is not bad, but we are afraid of some disadvantages. For instance, the sheep may be very old or not of a good type,” Siddiq Ahmed Hamad El-Niel, a Sudanese citizen, told Xinhua Monday.

According to official statistics, Sudan owns over 130 million head of cattle.

Some livestock traders attribute the price rise to the increase in Sudan’s animal exports, where the country’s livestock exports registered around 4 million head in 2016 not to mention the rush by external markets to Sudanese meat.

During the past three years, the Sudanese government depended on animal resources’ exports in addition to other resources, including gold, to compensate the loss of three quarters of its oil revenues which South Sudan took with when it separated with the north in 2011.

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